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Controversial Sexual Theater

Controversial theater has been around since theater had its beginnings with Thespis ( hence we now have “Thespians” ) in 534 BC. The theme of sexuality as a controversy was not lacking in those ancient times. It usually found its way into most plays, even if only by the fact that the storyline might consist of two lovesick fools, where the men played the part of women in those lovers’ roles.
Around a thousand years later or so, the Victorian Age, we get the playwright George Bernard Shaw.
He wrote the play “Mrs. Warren’s Profession”,  about a wealthy prostitute and her prude of a daughter.

The play was banned in Britain from being performed, due to its explicit content.
Around the same time in Germany, another play, “Spring Awakening” was being written by Frank Wedekind. This was banned in Germany, for about a century, due to its portrayal of masturbation, abortion, rape, bondage, child abuse and suicide. Needless to say,  all human life everywhere is interested in sex. It is a natural make up/design of our bodies and fortunately for Hollywood and Broadway, sex sells. Today “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” is taught in classrooms and the adapted for musical, “Spring Awakening”, has been given raving reviews and won several Tony awards.

So, if sex is only a natural desire and basic need within us all, why is it that any form of art or theater that deals with “explicit” content is considered to be “Taboo”?

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