Home > Theater > In the land of…..Memphis and Seeing Red

In the land of…..Memphis and Seeing Red

From The NY TIMES as reviewed by Charles Isherwood:

Sex and race and rock ’n’ roll made for a potent, at times inflammatory, combination in the 1950s, when the new musical “Memphis” is set. But there’s no need to fear that a conflagration will soon consume the Shubert Theater, where the show opened on Monday night. This slick but formulaic entertainment, written by David Bryan and Joe DiPietro, barely generates enough heat to warp a vinyl record, despite the vigorous efforts of a talented, hard-charging cast. While the all-important music, by Mr. Bryan of Bon Jovi, competently simulates a wide range of period rock, gospel and rhythm and blues, the crucial ingredient — authentic soul — is missing in action. —- 

Dare I suggest that “Memphis” is the Michael Bolton of Broadway musicals? I do.”

To read the whole article on the reveiew: 

http://theater.nytimes.com/2009/10/20/theater/reviews/20memphis.html 

As of last Sunday, Memphis took home the 2010 Tony Award for best musical.

I am betting this will now be on the near future list for Sam Germany.

As for the Tony for the best play, that went to Red. It is a play by American writer John Logan about artist Mark Rothko first produced by the Donmar Warehouse, London in December 2009. The original production was directed by Michael Grandage and performed by Alfred Molina as Rothko and Eddie Redmayne as his assistant Ken.

The production, with its two leads, transferred to Broadway at the John Golden Theater for a limited engagement which began on March 11, 2010 and closed on June 27.  It was the 2010.

What was it all about?

“There is only one thing I fear in life, my friend… One day the black will swallow the red.”[2]

Mark Rothko is in his New York studio in 1958-9, painting a group of murals for the expensive and exclusive Four Seasons restaurant. He gives orders to his assistant, Ken, as he mixes the paints, makes the frames, and paints the canvases. Ken, however, brashly questions Rothko’s theories of art and his acceeding to work on such a commercial project.

Red - show photos - Alfred Molina Rothko ( Molina )

 Ken ( Redmayne )

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